Rural Trespassing

If you live in the south, you know the weather has been pretty terrible as of late. We have received more than enough rain to make up for the drought from the past few years. In fact we have received too much rain. On top of all the rain we have had many mornings with very thick fog.

Fog is one of those things that speaks to the nature of humans; giving people a since of unease and elevated alert. The haunting ambiance that fog gives makes an everyday location moody and creepy. It is this ambiance that I felt would make for great photographs.

When the weather report called for another morning with fog I decided to wake up early and take advantage of natures mood lighting. There were a few areas in the rural sections around Auburn that I have been waiting to explore, and the fog would provide the much needed cover for me to wander around unnoticed as well as set a mood that would be fitting for the subjects I would be shooting.

I was looking for forgotten structures like old farmsteads, chimneys, and graveyards. Subjects that already have a ghostly mood that would only be elevated by the ambiance that the fog would give. For some reason these old, abandoned structures have been an area of interest to me as of late. I find myself wanting to know what these same structures were like in their prime, piecing together the clues that are left, to come up with my own image of years past. Often times I am left with more questions than answers and I think it is that fact that makes me want to learn more.

These are a few images from my explorations. Rather than using the focal length of the lens to create depth, I decided to use the natural depth of field of the fog. The outcome was varied, sometimes I got the effect I was looking for and sometimes I did not. But that is why we experiment, to learn what works and what doesn’t. I hope you enjoy the images.

Comments

  1. This relationship with old structures must be genetic. My dad was always pointing out old buildings, particularly old abandoned stores along what used to be the main highways. It was his way to note the changes in society – new roads were built, businesses moved with them and the old ones were left to nature. He liked those buildings.

    I’ve always been interested in old farm “out buildings” – barns, equipment sheds and such. For me it was the fascination with how they were constructed, their utility, and their longevity. Many of these buildings were simply constructed, but durable and efficient – they were elegant in their own way.

    Enjoyed the post.

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